Village Scene

The ASHRAM Is a Sandalwood miniature carved Decorative item, Total Hand Carved piece With Indian Traditional Miniature Carving Work. Wood Carved animals and Tree Gives This Piece a Perfect Village Look. And Makes It Attractive.

Size : 18''x12'' Quantity :

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The Story of

ASHRAM

(VILLAGE SCENE)

The ASHRAM is a Story about Shakuntala, The story of Dushyanta's marriage, separation and reunion with his queen Shakuntala, has been immortalized in the Mahabharata and in The Recognition of Shakuntala by the great Sanskrit poet Kalidas.

Dushyant meets Shakuntala, who is daughter of Vishvamitra and Menaka, while on an excursion from his kingdom. Depending on the source,[citation needed] Dushyant is either the crown prince, or he is waiting to win back his kingdom from an enemy. Either way, he sees Shakuntala in an ashram [also known as hermitage] this ashram is situated at Kota, Rajasthan in India named as Kanswa a nationally protected monument by government of India (hermitage) of Rishi Kanva and falls in love. He and Shakuntala have a gandharva marriage there. Having to leave after some time, Dushyant gives Shakuntala a royal ring as a sign of their love, promising her that he will come to her.

But when Dushyant becomes king, he becomes too absorbed for many years in affairs of state. Shakuntala waits and despairs.

One day, sage Durvasa visits the hermitage, but Shakuntala, who is too absorbed in her love for Dushyant, forgets to serve him food. In a fit of anger, sage Durvasa curses her, saying that the person she is thinking about will forget her. A shocked Shakuntala begs for forgiveness and the sage, after recollecting his calm, assures her that the person will remember her again when she shows some proof of their acquaintance. So Shakuntala sets off to the capital, Hastinapur, to remind Dushyant of their past love. An accident occurs by which a fish consumes the royal ring, leaving Shakuntala with no formidable proof.

Dushyanta does not recollect Shakuntala, but his memory and love are rekindled when a sage (not the same who cursed Shakuntala) recovers the ring and brings it to the court. Dushyanta weds Shakuntala, who becomes his queen and mother of his son, Bharata. 

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